All special program offerings will occur on-site at the Summit location, the Gaylord National Convention Center.
 
Workshop I.
An Introduction to Blue Carbon for the Coastal Restoration and Management Community: Linking Climate Mitigation and Adaptation with Conservation
Sunday, November 2, 9:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Limited to 50 participants/ Fee: $75 lunch included
 

Coastal blue carbon refers to the carbon stored, sequestered or released from seagrass meadows, salt marshes, mangroves and other tidal wetlands. Conservation and restoration of these ecosystems can achieve climate change mitigation and adaptation benefits.  Increasing recognition of this ecosystem service is leading to new incentives for, and increased public and private investment in, improved management of coastal and estuarine habitat.

This workshop will provide an introduction to blue carbon concepts, the voluntary carbon market, the science of GHGs in blue carbon ecosystems, barriers to implementation, and opportunities for coastal management. Participants will gain an understanding of blue carbon and how to apply it in the landscapes where they work.  Please note: workshop participants will be expected to review materials provided by the organizers in advance of the workshop
 
Session topics include:
  • An Introduction to Coastal Blue Carbon – Why All the Fuss? – Steve Emmett-Mattox, Restore America’s Estuaries
  • Potential Application of Blue Carbon in the Landscape – Linking to Coastal Restoration and ManagementSteve Crooks, ESA
  • Applying Greenhouse Gas Offset Accounting Methodologies for Carbon CreditsIgino Emmer, Silverstrum
  • The Past and Future of Blue Carbon in California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin DeltaLisamarie Windham-Myers, U.S. Geological Survey
  • Is the Carbon From Here or There? Importance of Source Identification in Sequestered Blue CarbonMeagan Gonneea, U.S. Geological Survey
  • Blue Carbon Blues: The Many Challenges of Accounting for CH4 and N2O Emissions in Tidal WetlandsJ.  Patrick Megonigal, Smithsonian Environmental Research Center
Workshop Presenters:

Steve Emmett-Mattox has been developing strategic initiatives for Restore America’s Estuaries for 14 years. Since 2009, he has been leading the national blue carbon program. He managed the technical team which wrote the Wetland Restoration and Conservation (WRC) requirements for the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS), and managed and co-authored the draft Tidal Wetland and Seagrass Restoration Methodology for GHG offsets. Steve has more than twenty-five years of experience in environmental protection and conservation. 

Steve Crooks is Climate Change Program Manager at ESA, Co-Chair of the International Science Working Group, and an approved Verified Carbon Standard AFOLU Methodology expert for Wetlands Restoration and Conservation.  He works on the connections between science and policy to support wiser management of wetlands for climate adaptation and mitigation both here in the U.S. and internationally.

Igino Emmer PhD has 20 years of experience in creating carbon assets in land-based climate change mitigation projects, providing services in certification of projects and creating GHG accounting protocols under various carbon standards. Recently he helped draft accounting procedures for blue carbon projects together with several U.S.-based partners.

Lisa Windham-Myers is a research ecologist with the USGS, with a focus on soils and plant physiology, and their influence on carbon, nutrient, and trace metal biogeochemistry in wetlands. She serves in several local, national, and international science advisory efforts to evaluate wetland management and mapping approaches to document and optimize carbon sequestration in tidal wetlands. Recent awards include NASA projects that focus on projecting marsh response to sea level rise and national quantification of coastal wetland carbon stocks and fluxes to meet inventory and market incentives.

Meagan Gonneea is a National Science Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow based at the USGS investigating salt marsh carbon dynamics. She has worked in a wide range of coastal ecosystems, including mangroves, coral reefs and salt marshes, to understand both the transport of terrestrial materials into coastal waters and the biogeochemical transformations that occur at the coastal zone. She has a B.S. and M.S. from Stanford University and a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program.

J. Patrick Megonigal is a Senior Scientist and Deputy Director of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. He received BS and MS degrees from Old Dominion University, and a PhD from Duke University. Dr. Megonigal is an expert in tidal wetland ecosystem responses to global changes such as rising carbon dioxide, nitrogen pollution and sea level rise. His research is focused on plant-microbe interactions and biogeochemical cycling, particularly as it relates to carbon cycling, GHG emissions, and the vulnerability of tidal wetlands to sea level rise. 

Sponsored by: 

USGS color logo

 

 


 
Workshop II.
Weaving Your Coastal Network:  Environmental Leadership Program Training for Coastal Professionals
Sunday, November 2, 1:00 pm - 5:00 pm
Limited to 30 participants / Fee $70
 
Are you new to the professional world of coastal management and restoration, or are you ready to reinvigorate your coastal network? This workshop, a special program of The Coastal Society (TCS), will be an intensive leadership, community, and network-building training program for coastal professionals, whether you are new to the field or an experienced practitioner seeking opportunities to build your network. TCS has a long tradition of offering coastal leadership development and mentoring programs to coastal professionals. This year’s workshop will be offered by the Environmental Leadership Program (ELP), a nationally recognized leadership and professional development training program for emerging environmental practitioners. ELP trainings have benefited many TCS members, including past presidents Kristen Fletcher and Kate Morrison. This workshop, specially designed for the coastal management and restoration community, will focus on network weaving. Participants will reflect on their coastal management and restoration professional networks and will gain skills in recognizing, building, and utilizing their networks as they grow into coastal leaders. Participants will then have the opportunity to apply these skills through their participation in the TCS-RAE Summit. Errol Mazursky, ELP Executive Director and professional facilitator, will lead this energizing training and community-building event. 
 
There will be an optional lunch before the workshop, Noon-1:00 pm, for TCS members (not included in registration fee). Further information will be provided when you register.
 
 
Workshop III.
Coastal Community Resilience Training Course
Sunday, November 2, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm (Also offered on Thursday)
Limited to 30 participants / Free
 
Coastal Communities around the world are experiencing unprecedented change resulting from population growth in coastal regions and increased vulnerability to natural hazards. Resilient coastal communities plan for and take action to mitigate the risks from coastal hazards, increase the pace of recovery from destructive events, and adapt to changing environments.
 
This four-hour “Coastal Community Resilience” course will assist to raise awareness of the hazards faced by coastal communities, the potential social, economic, and environmental impacts of these hazards, approaches to prevent or mitigate hazard impacts, and tools to increase resilience. The course will emphasize target capabilities to enhance preparedness for and response to natural disasters, demonstrate how to integrate risk and community-based collaborative strategies into plans and programs, and introduce tools that help communities assess individual risks and vulnerabilities.
 
This is a FEMA Certified course. This course is listed in the FEMA National Training and Education Division (NTED) Catalog.  It is taught by the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center at the University of Hawai’I (NPDTC).  
 
 
Workshop IV.
Coastal Community Resilience Training Course
Thursday, November 6, 8:00 am – Noon (Also offered on Sunday)
Limited to 30 participants / Free
 
Coastal Communities around the world are experiencing unprecedented change resulting from population growth in coastal regions and increased vulnerability to natural hazards. Resilient coastal communities plan for and take action to mitigate the risks from coastal hazards, increase the pace of recovery from destructive events, and adapt to changing environments.
 
This four-hour “Coastal Community Resilience” course will assist to raise awareness of the hazards faced by coastal communities, the potential social, economic, and environmental impacts of these hazards, approaches to prevent or mitigate hazard impacts, and tools to increase resilience. The course will emphasize target capabilities to enhance preparedness for and response to natural disasters, demonstrate how to integrate risk and community-based collaborative strategies into plans and programs, and introduce tools that help communities assess individual risks and vulnerabilities.
 
This is a FEMA Certified course. This course is listed in the FEMA National Training and Education Division (NTED) Catalog.  It is taught by the National Disaster Preparedness Training Center at the University of Hawai’I (NPDTC).  

 
Workshop V.  
Improving Restoration Monitoring Design
Thursday, November 6, 8:30 am – 5:00 pm
Limited to 40 participants / Fee $95 / Lunch included
 
Have you ever questioned the effectiveness of your monitoring or been frustrated with its limitations? (Be honest!) This interactive, full-day workshop will offer restoration practitioners valuable knowledge, skills, and tools to enhance their ability to design and implement restoration projects that account for ecosystem services, quality of non-quantitative data, and ecological and non-ecological constraints on monitoring implementation. Participants will gain insight into developing monitoring approaches for adaptive management using a logic model-based framework. Applying this thoughtful planning method will avoid some of the pitfalls that restoration practitioners often encounter in monitoring efforts. Geared toward experienced practitioners, this training does not focus on a specific monitoring protocol, but rather improving planning of monitoring strategies.
 
Workshop Presenters: 
This workshop will be led by experienced NOAA staff. Veteran coastal restoration professionals will assist with the development and presentation of the training to make it “field tested,” relevant, and meaningful for attendees.

 
 
Workshop VI.
From Discovery to Data Vis: How to Communicate Science on the Web
Thursday, November 6, 9:00 am - 12:30 pm
Limited to 40 participants / Fee $50
 
Do you have science that you want to share? This interactive half-day workshop offers science, restoration, and conservation professionals the knowledge and skills needed to communicate scientific information on the web. Participants will gain insight into the world of online communications, where knowing your audience is key, and where the right combination of words and images will help you beat the limits of a short attention span. 
 
Following this course, you will:
  • Know how to use the common techniques of “discovery research” to learn about your audience and identify their needs. 
  • Recognize the importance of conducting discovery research before a digital product is built and know how to sell the case for this process to a management team.
  • Understand how the tone, audience, and content of blog posts, Tweets, and other forms of web writing differ from traditional print communication.
  • Be able to use your understanding of web writing to transform scientific information into content that is appropriate for the online audience.
  • Recognize the elements of effective data visualization.
  • Understand how data visualization can allow you to impact and engage more people in your work 
Workshop Presenters:
This workshop will be conducted by web professionals who have worked closely on Chesapeake Bay issues. 
 
Guy Stephens is the Director of Web Development for the Chesapeake Bay Program and an employee of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science. He oversees a small team that develops a range of web products for this unique regional partnership, with a focus on informing and educating a diverse set of audiences on issues related to the Chesapeake Bay. He is an advocate for user needs and for building high-quality web products. He is also the owner of Southern Maryland Photography, a past president of the Calvert Photography Club, and a skilled teacher who instructs part-time at the College of Southern Maryland. 
 
Catherine Krikstan is a Web Writer and Social Media Specialist for the Chesapeake Bay Program and an employee of the Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay. She is a former journalist who loves turning complex information into simple, straightforward, and easy-to-understand content. She specializes in communicating science and in writing and editing content that informs and educates a diverse set of audiences on issues related to the Chesapeake Bay. 
 
Mike Land is the Director of Digital and Design for the National Park Service Chesapeake Bay office. He is a user experience designer who has spent more than 16 years building exemplary user interactions across a range of digital channels, leading cross-disciplinary teams in delivering simple, elegant, and accessible products. He is focused on defining and executing design strategies that marry a deep understanding of business objectives and user needs with the fundamental elements of great digital experiences.

 
Workshop VII.
Restoring the Natural Functions of Wetlands: Identifying Common Goals for Advancing Wetland Restoration Success
Thursday, November 6, 9:30 am - 5:00 pm
Pre-registration is strongly advised, walk-ins allowed if space is available

 

New Voluntary Restoration Workshop & Listening Session just added! Receive some free training on EPA's Restoration Potential Screening Tool* and join EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans and Watersheds in a facilitated listening session. The morning will be reserved for free training on important restoration tools sponsored by EPA and in the afternoon, participate in a facilitated discussion. We want to hear from you! Share your wetland restoration stories and challenges with other wetland practitioners! We hope to identify how we can work together to accomplish better wetland restoration projects. Let's talk: Where do we as a community of restoration practitioners want to be in 5 years? 10 years? What types of collaborations, technical information, and training would be helpful?

The all-day workshop is free - lunch on your own- but you must register directly with EPA's Wetlands Division by emailing to, dils.rebecca@epa.gov.

*The Recovery Potential Screening (RPS) tool will use an estuarine watershed as a demo. The RPS tool now covers all the lower 48 at HUC12 scale with hundreds of indicators.